news, crime, tesla 3, stolen, theft, phone

The insistent buzzing of Annabelle Brett’s mobile phone was enough to wake her up well before the work alarm dictated this week. The phone alerted Ms Brett to another alarm going off downstairs, that of a Tesla 3. Her $70,000 electric vehicle had been locked up in the garage of her Braddon apartment. “I went downstairs really quickly with my friend who’s staying with me, and we realised the car was gone,” Ms Brett said. “You can see on my phone app where exactly my car is at all times, and you could see that it was driving away.” Bravely, maybe a little recklessly, the pair took chase of the Tesla in a second vehicle, using the map on the Tesla’s phone app to meet the unsuspecting thieves at every turn. “From the app I can actually mess with my car, so I started messing with the speed so they couldn’t drive fast,” Ms Brett said. Hot on the trail of the Tesla, Ms Brett also used her phone to beep the horn, roll the windows up and down and call the police. Meanwhile, her vigilante sidekick was easily keeping up with the compromised car as it wound down Henty Street. Perhaps spooked by the robot car’s bells and whistles, probably wishing they’d stolen a Honda Civic, the thieves terminated the pursuit in a Haig Park car park. Moments later, Ms Brett and her driver pull up on the road adjacent to the car park, where they observed a second car had pulled up alongside the Tesla. Once again, Ms Brett’s phone was the best weapon against injustice. “I managed to film us arriving and film them in my car and then film them driving away,” Ms Brett said. An accomplice had met the stolen vehicle and was attempting to help the driver evade the law in a getaway car, abandoning the Tesla in the park. Police arrived not long after and were shown the footage. Ms Brett said they instantly recognised the individuals involved. The police then viewed footage filmed from the Tesla and surveillance footage from Ms Brett’s apartment. “They rang me 15 minutes after we left and said they had the guy in custody already,” she said. After handing over the footage, making her statement and allowing her car to be tested for fingerprints, Ms Brett thought the day of surprises was done. READ ALSO: “When I went to get my car cleaned this afternoon I noticed there was a letter in the side door and it wasn’t mine,” she said. A second person alleged to have been involved had left their driver’s license inside the Tesla. Police advised there had been some difficulty identifying the man, but a photo ID should do it. When they went around to make the arrest the man, who’d allegedly wagged his middle finger in the air as he’d taken off from Haig Park, appeared to have lost his bravado. “Apparently one of them was hiding under a bed at his mum’s house,” Ms Brett said. Police investigations are yet to determine how the thieves got hold of keys to the Tesla 3, which Ms Brett said was renowned for being very difficult to break into. “When we saw my car driving off we just went after it, we didn’t stop to think how dangerous and stupid it was,” Ms Brett said. “But I was able to stop them on the app, which is pretty crazy technology.”

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The insistent buzzing of Annabelle Brett’s mobile phone was enough to wake her up well before the work alarm dictated this week.

The phone alerted Ms Brett to another alarm going off downstairs, that of a Tesla 3. Her $70,000 electric vehicle had been locked up in the garage of her Braddon apartment.

“I went downstairs really quickly with my friend who’s staying with me, and we realised the car was gone,” Ms Brett said.

“You can see on my phone app where exactly my car is at all times, and you could see that it was driving away.”

Bravely, maybe a little recklessly, the pair took chase of the Tesla in a second vehicle, using the map on the Tesla’s phone app to meet the unsuspecting thieves at every turn.

“From the app I can actually mess with my car, so I started messing with the speed so they couldn’t drive fast,” Ms Brett said.

Hot on the trail of the Tesla, Ms Brett also used her phone to beep the horn, roll the windows up and down and call the police.

Meanwhile, her vigilante sidekick was easily keeping up with the compromised car as it wound down Henty Street.

Perhaps spooked by the robot car’s bells and whistles, probably wishing they’d stolen a Honda Civic, the thieves terminated the pursuit in a Haig Park car park.

Moments later, Ms Brett and her driver pull up on the road adjacent to the car park, where they observed a second car had pulled up alongside the Tesla.

Once again, Ms Brett’s phone was the best weapon against injustice.

“I managed to film us arriving and film them in my car and then film them driving away,” Ms Brett said.

An accomplice had met the stolen vehicle and was attempting to help the driver evade the law in a getaway car, abandoning the Tesla in the park.

Police arrived not long after and were shown the footage.

Ms Brett said they instantly recognised the individuals involved.

The police then viewed footage filmed from the Tesla and surveillance footage from Ms Brett’s apartment.

“They rang me 15 minutes after we left and said they had the guy in custody already,” she said.

After handing over the footage, making her statement and allowing her car to be tested for fingerprints, Ms Brett thought the day of surprises was done.

“When I went to get my car cleaned this afternoon I noticed there was a letter in the side door and it wasn’t mine,” she said.

A second person alleged to have been involved had left their driver’s license inside the Tesla.

Police advised there had been some difficulty identifying the man, but a photo ID should do it.

When they went around to make the arrest the man, who’d allegedly wagged his middle finger in the air as he’d taken off from Haig Park, appeared to have lost his bravado.

“Apparently one of them was hiding under a bed at his mum’s house,” Ms Brett said.

Police investigations are yet to determine how the thieves got hold of keys to the Tesla 3, which Ms Brett said was renowned for being very difficult to break into.

“When we saw my car driving off we just went after it, we didn’t stop to think how dangerous and stupid it was,” Ms Brett said.

“But I was able to stop them on the app, which is pretty crazy technology.”