How does ibuprofen affect routine blood tests?

  • At normal doses, it should not affect any routine blood tests.

    Ibuprofen belongs to a class of drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, which includes aspirin too. It is a non-selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase (COX), inhibiting both COX-1 and COX-2. That enzyme is responsible for producing one of the molecules that is involved in inflammation. It also can inhibit the function of platelets, which are a component of blood that participate in coagulation, so it may alter coagulation testing. This effect is temporary, unlike aspirin, which permanently inhibits platelet function for the lifetime of the platelets, which is about a week.

    It will not affect platelet count, and neither does aspirin…the effect of low-dose aspirin is to modify the way platelets work in forming clots, not decreasing their numbers. However, ibuprofen may interfere with that effect of aspirin.

    Why are these boots recommended by millions as the warmest shoes?

    Wear this waterproof and orthopedic winter boots that you won’t want to take off all winter long!

    It doesn’t at least not routine tests as stated.

    Ibuprofen can cause gastric bleeding and kidney failure – and this would show up on these tests – but certainly this doesn’t represent unwanted interference with the results! Identifying these dangerous side effects would be very important.

    My stage 4 kidney cancer was detected because my blood calcium level was too high. This was an indication of a cancer somewhere. It could have been a cancer in my bones releasing calcium from them, but in my case, most of 1 kidney was cancerous, so the kidneys were unable to remove as much calcium as usual from the blood they were filtering. A CT scan showed where the cancer was.

    Two things here:

    1. My GP made a very good pick up to spot the high calcium level and get it checked with a CT scan. All the specialists I have since seen have said so, suggesting many doctors would have thought ‘let’s wait and see what it is next time’. There would have been NO next time – if they hadn’t done the operation then to take out the kidney, I was literally weeks (not months) from death. You bet I gave my GP a big hug!
    2. Unfortunately, this symptom only occurred when the cancer was so advanced and serious. I was having blood tests every 3 months so we knew it had not been high 3 months prior. So you cannot rely on a blood test for early detection of this sort of cancer. My surgeon said this tumour had been growing for decades.

    In short, I was lucky … and I still am 3.5 years later!

    It shouldn’t affect routine blood tests at all, but if you are in doubt, tell your doctor that you were taking ibuprofen before the lab did the blood draw.

    Its just a pain reliver and doesnt stay in your system and routine blood work doesnt look for any drugs just for say liver functions or check blood cells

    The only think I’m aware of that ibuprofen can effect in a routine blood test is the level of triglycerides. It may lower them.

    I know that ibuprofen works by thinning your blood, which decreases vascular pressure and inflammation.

    Ibuprofen taken just before a routine blood test might show a lower platelet count…platelets determine bleeding times.

    But unless you take it 3–4 times a day for months or years, it shouldn’t affect the blood test. Be sure to let the lab tech know so they can make a note of it on your test result.

    It doesn’t affect Routine blood testing- but I never prescribe it for more than five days because of its serious side effects if used long term- yet doctors have patients on ibuprofen for extended periods of time- but that is another subject.

    It can be a very effective medication for many different types of minor pain. The side effects of ibuprofen include stomach upset and nausea. People that have a history of gastric ulcers should not take ibuprofen because this can cause or worsen an ulcer. People that have kidney disease or heart disease should also avoid ibuprofen unless cleared by their doctor. This is because ibuprofen can exacerbate chronic kidney disease if taken in high enough doses for a long enough time. The use of ibuprofen should not affect any of your blood chemistries if it is only taken once. In addition, it will not affect your cholesterol level. I should also note here that the modern machines the check for cholesterol can often do so in someone that is not fasting. You should check with your doctor to make sure that fasting is necessary for this particular blood draw. It still is in some cases. This is especially true if your have your triglycerides checked which can be affected by eating within four hours of the blood test. Again, I would suggest that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physician to discuss this issue.

    It doesn’t unless taken chronically and in large doses. Kidney values sometimes may be affected in chronic dosing but nothing else. A one time dose does not do anything.

    —————//

Buy CBD Oil Arizona